An overview of the gross and grotesque in flannery oconnor

Flannery O'Connor's fiction generates strong reactions because of her use of the gross and grotesque.

Flannery O'Connor

We live now in an age which doubts both fact and value, which is swept this way and that by momentary convictions. It has only been within the last five or six decades that writers have won this supposed emancipation.

Flannery O'Connor (1925-1964)

I believe that they come about from the prophetic vision peculiar to any novelist whose concerns I have been describing. I hate to think of the day when the Southern writer will satisfy the tired reader. May, and his horns pierce her heart. On the other hand, if the writer believes that our life is and will remain essentially mysterious, if he looks upon us as beings existing in a created order to whose laws we freely respond, then what he sees on the surface will be of interest to him only as he can go through it into an experience of mystery itself.

Her characters are lost in their search for redemption. I am always having it pointed out to me that life in Georgia is not at all the way I picture it, that escaped criminals do not roam the roads exterminating families, nor Bible salesmen prowl about looking for girls with wooden legs.

An example of O'Connor's use of the grotesque to shock and to show the characters reformation is in her story "Greenleaf. Distortion in this case is an instrument; exaggeration has a purpose, and the whole structure of the story or novel has been made what it is because of belief.

And his need, of course, is to be lifted up. If the novelist is in tune with this spirit, if he believes that actions are predetermined by psychic make-up or the economic situation or some other determinable factor, then he will be concerned above all with an accurate reproduction of the things that most immediately concern man, with the natural forces that he feels control his destiny.

Cleaning his glasses consequently symbolizes a brief attempt to clean his soul Ghosts can be very fierce and instructive.

In The Habit of Being: Fascinated by birds of all kinds, she raised ducks, ostriches, emus, toucans, and any sort of exotic bird she could obtain, while incorporating images of peacocks into her books.

There is no literary, orthodoxy that can be prescribed as settled for the fiction writer, not even that of Henry James, who balanced the elements of traditional realism and romance so admirably within each of his novels.

Hazel tries desperately to deny his fundamentalist background to the extreme. On the other hand, if the writer believes that our life is and will remain essentially mysterious, if he looks upon us as beings existing in a created order to whose laws we freely respond, then what he sees on the surface will be of interest to him only as he can go through it into an experience of mystery itself.

This form of humor I can see in Flannery O'Connor's works. Today novels are considered to be entirely concerned with the social or economic or, psychological forces that they will by necessity exhibit, or with those details of daily life that are for the good novelist only means to some deeper end.

If you are a Southern writer, that label, and all the misconceptions that go with it, is pasted on you at once, and you are left to get it off as best you can. The presence alone of Faulkner in our midst makes a great difference in what the writer can and cannot permit himself to do.

To the modern mind, this kind of character, and his creator, are typical Don Quixotes, tilting at what is not there. Instead of reflecting a balance from the world around him, the novelist now has to achieve one from a felt balance inside himself.

When we look at a good deal of serious modern fiction, and particularly Southern fiction, we find this quality about it that is generally described, in a pejorative sense, as grotesque. Chelsea House Publishers, She died on August 3,at the age of 39 in Baldwin County Hospital.

There was a time when the average reader read a novel simply for the moral he could get out of it, and however naive that may have been, it was a good deal less naive than some of the more limited objectives he now has. The writer has no rights at till except those he forges for himself inside his own work.

I think that Flannery O'Connor uses the grotesque in her writing because it shocks readers and makes them realize the moral point she is expressing.

It is generally accepted that the moment of grace occurs as the grandmother reaches out toward the Misfit, calls him one of her children, and then is shot three times. In many of O'Connor's stories, the conclusions or endings are surprising, as they are ridiculous and horrible; thus, she uses the grotesque for a melodramatic effect.

The writer who writes within what might be called the modern romance tradition may not be writing novels which in all respects partake of a novelistic orthodoxy; but as long as these works have vitality, as long as they present something that is alive, however eccentric its life may seem to the general reader, then they have to be dealt with; and they have to be dealt with on their own terms.

I hate to think that in twenty years Southern writers too may be writing about men in gray-flannel suits and may have lost their ability to see that these gentlemen are even greater freaks than what we are writing about now.

According to Gentry, O'Connor took it as her artistic enterprise to transform images of negative grotesquerie into part of a redemptive process.Comments and analysis from The Telegraph.

An overview of the gross and grotesque in flannery oconnor

the to a of and in for an overview of the gross and grotesque in flannery oconnor on that is said was with at The best opinions. A Defense of the Grotesque in Flannery O’Connor’s Art R. Jared Staudt. In fact, they would probably be grotesque. A student once asked me, how can we call Flannery O’Connor’s writing beautiful when it is so focused on the grotesque?

First of all, we could point to the elegance of her style and her perfection of the craft of writing. -Flannery O’Connor, The Habit of Being (). The function of the grotesque in the short fiction of Flannery O’Connor is often to challenge the preconceptions of both her characters and her readers.

Flannery O'Connor and the Southern Grotesque A Study of Good and Evil in the Southern United States Biography O'Connor's Ideas Of Faith The Southern.

Flannery O'Connor is considered one of America's greatest fiction writers and one of the strongest apologists for Roman Catholicism in the twentieth century. Born of the marriage of two of Georgia's oldest Catholic families, O'Connor was a devout believer whose small but impressive body of fiction.

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